Counting the Omer

 

Tonight is the 7th night of counting the Omer.  The Omer is the 50 day period between Pesach and Shavuot.  We are commanded to count these 50 days in VaYikra (Levticus) 23.15-16 which states, “‘From the day after the day of rest -that is, from the day you bring the sheaf for waving -you are to count seven full weeks, until the day after the seventh week; you are to count fifty days; and then you are to present a new grain offering to ADONAI.”  The rabbis tell us that it took seven weeks from Passover for the children of Israel to reach Mt. Sinai where they received the Torah on the 6th of Sivan which is Shavuot. Instead of counting down, 50-49-48, etc., we count up towards 50.  The reason behind this is that we are to be anticipating or expecting the arrival of Shavuot.

Expectation is a biblical concept.  It is often conveyed by the Hebrew word “tikvah” which can also be translated as wait or hope,   The imagery behind this word is to wait with eagerness being confident in the person you are waiting on.  I shared recently in a message that hope is like an anchor that is fixed on the unseen.  When we are waiting on G-d, it is with a confidence in Him to fulfill His word in our lives.  In Acts 1 Yeshua told His talmidim to “wait” in Jerusalem for the promise of the Father – the Ruach HaKodesh.  The disciples went to Jerusalem and we read in Acts 2 that they were filled with the Ruach in accordance to the Promise of Adonai.

Adonai has so much He wants to do in our lives.  This season of counting the Omer should be a season of expecting G-d to act in our lives (Tehillim 42.11) with the confidence that He will not let us down.  I encourage you to start counting the omer each day.  As you count, begin to anticipate the fulfillment of the promises of G-d in your life.  Expect break through and release.  Lamentations 3.25 declares, “ADONAI is good to those waiting for him, to those who are seeking him out.”  Let the remaining six weeks of counting the omer be one of earnestly seeking the presence of G-d with anticipation.  He is a good G-d who will respond.

Brachot,

Rabbi Carol



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